CMMC

CMMC IS A REQUIREMENT, NOT A CHOICE. ARE YOU READY for a game-changer?

Meet our Community of Trust (CoT) for a holistic approach. 

Reprivata can help you navigate the process of becoming CMMC compliant.

Using our enclave to achieve CMMC level 3 Compliance can be a low-cost yet faster and easier solution to implement than the alternatives.

Reprivata’s unique Community of Trust (COT) platform offers the most holistic and comprehensive solution to prepare you for your Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) audit. We are not a consultant or integrator. We help with CMMC compliance and other frameworks. We secure your CUI in our unique COT platform for CMMC compliance. We isolate Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) into its own security domain by applying architectural design concepts unique through our COT platform. We provide one of the most cost-effective solutions for becoming CMMC compliant. 

Companies must respond to the challenge. Reprivata™ knows the challenge and provides a patented, proven solution. Reprivata’s SASE platform is reprivatizing data networks, communications, and digital identities. We are ready to help you prepare for your CMMC compliance audit. 

Community of Trust (CoT) Network

TECHNOLOGY
SASE secures any device over any network

CoT Legal Framework

POLICY & GOVERNANCE
Provides standardized agreements to third parties

CoT Privacy Authority


MONITORING
Captures/manages data to ensure privacy law compliance and monitors compliance

Global Threat Intelligence

TECHNOLOGY
Offers military-grade cybersecurity and real-time collaboration

Why This Works

Reprivata provides a fully integrated solution in our enclave (a micro-segmented private network).  Our integrated solution is affordable and easy to implement.

Reprivata facilitates cyber maturity through a holistic encrypted network enclave solution. This follows our Community of Trust approach for organizations of all sizes to rapidly protect their information with a technical solution while learning the details of cyber maturity. When the network is protected with Zero Trust Network Access and Role-Based Access Controls, nearly 100% of the cyber controls are met. The Global Threat Intelligence system monitors border traffic, then blocks attempts. Then, the organization can take the following steps toward cyber maturity.

Your Community of Trust team members first use the Compliance Policy Center to operate from multiple cybersecurity frameworks (NIST SP 800-171r2, CMMC, CSF, PCI, NIST 800-66 for HIPAA). The Policy Creator workflow then uses selected frameworks and desired cyber maturity level to create the policies and procedures you need to protect Controlled Unclassified Information, Intellectual Property, and Privacy Data. These policies and procedures address another 50% of the cyber controls to enhance the organization’s cyber behavior. Suppose you need to add a unique compliance framework not already in the Framework Management System. In that case, the system allows you to upload your own. Meanwhile, the Policy Surveillance System monitors the network for anomalies and vulnerabilities.

The Surveillance System also checks logged entries. These are entries you create as evidence that your maturing organization follows the new approach toward cyber maturity. If something gets missed, the surveillance monitor identifies what needs to be done and provides some e-Coaching to help your team get back on track. When the team feels comfortable with their progress, they may conduct a self-assessment using the Assessment Management System. The system scores your progress along the way as it provides insight into what remains to be done. Suppose you already have completed an assessment in one framework and desire to know what remains to be done. In that case, we have a Reverse Mapping capability that helps you see what remains. Let us help you meet your new goals for cyber maturity.

For every $1 spent
on cyber security

$4 IS LOST

$0B
Last year $125B was spent on cyber security.
$0B
And over $500B was still lost through cyber security breaches.

Reprivata’s SASE is the first – and only – platform that enables you to address all the aspects of CMMC for current and ongoing certifications.

NOT DISRUPTIVE
AFFORDABLE
FAST IMPLEMENTATION
Previous
Next

While there are many consultants offering to assist you with CMMC compliance, Reprivata is one of the only turn-key solutions that offer an all-encompassing platform for managing your CMMC compliance documents. Here’s the Reprivata difference:

Affordable Cost-Effective Solutions

Reprivata offers cost-effective solutions. Our enclave is not a piecemeal solution that requires hours of consulting time and numerous integrated tools.

Fast Implementation

We can have you compliant within a few weeks, where the competition may take months. 

Complete Guidance for all Processes and Policies

Our solutions create policies for a complete guidance tool across these four areas: Management, Operational, Privacy and Technical.

Isolated CUI

Through Reprivata’s unique platform, you can isolate your CUI versus your entire network into a highly encrypted enclave for making the CMMC compliance process much easier.

Create Your Own ADHOC

Reprivata’s unique platform allows you to create your own ADHOC compliance framework based on your current risk management plan.

Another first from the team
known for firsts

Innovation is part of our collective DNA. Consider our history of making history…

1987
First Fiber Optic Franchise
1987
1991
First Ethernet* as a Service
1991
1992
First Commercial Internet Peering-Point
1992
1994
First Commercial Streaming Media Service
1994
1999
First Apps As a Service “Cloud”
1999
2001
First Video on Demand - Six Years Before Netflix & Amazon
2001
2018
First NSA-Level Dedicated Private Network out of software only
2018
2018
First Multi-Layer Encryption Software certified by UL Cyber Assurance Program 2900
2018
2018
First System and Method of Network Privacy that enables End-Users full title or rights to all data
2018

Have a few questions about the CMMC process? Here are some frequently asked questions and answers.

CMMC stands for Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) was created by the Department of Defense (DOD) to make sure Defense Industrial Base (DIB) have cybersecurity practices to protect federal contact information (FCI) and controlled unclassified information (CUI).

All private contractors wanting to do business with the Department of Defense (DoD) will need to become CMMC certified to bid on contracts.

Defense contractors will need CMMC third-party certification before bidding on Department of Defense (DoD) contracts. Contractor self-assessments are being phased out and will cease to be acceptable when submitting a bid. However, completing a self-assessment before a CMMC audit will give Defense Industrial Base (DIB) companies the best chance at CMMC compliance on the first try.

As of September 2020, the Department of Defense (DoD) Requests for Information (RFI) and Requests for Proposal (RFP) documents will begin to include CMMC requirements. The phased rollout has plans that all new DoD contract bids will require CMMC compliance by 2026. Toggle Content

The Department of Defense (DoD) recognizes that risk profiles differ for each contract and does not want to burden its Defense Industrial Base (DIB) with unnecessary requirements. Request for Information (RFI) and Request for Proposal (RFP) documents will outline which CMMC level 1 – 5 will be required. Level 1 certification is the easiest to obtain and ensures contractors meet basic requirements to protect Federal Contract Information (FCI). Each subsequent level offers further protections based on the Federal Contact Information (FCI) and Controlled

CUI in CMMC is Controlled Unclassified Information.
“CUI is information the Government creates or possesses, or that an entity creates or possesses for or on behalf of the Government, that a law, regulation, or Government-wide policy requires or permits an agency to handle using safeguarding or dissemination controls.”


*As defined by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition & Sustainment
CMMC Levels 1 and 2 apply to defense contractors who do not handle CUI. Contractors who do deal with CUI will need certification at higher CMMC levels.

FCI in CMMC is Federal Contract Information.
“Federal contract information means information, not intended for public release, that is provided by or generated for the Government under a contract to develop or deliver a product or service to the Government, but not including information provided by the Government to the public (such as on public websites) or simple transactional information, such as necessary to process payments.”
*As defined by Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) clause 52.204-21
If your business plans to handle information related to the government under a DoD contract, you will likely need to meet specific CMMC Level 1 requirements to safeguard this FCI.

All private contractors wanting to do business with the Department of Defense (DoD) will need to become CMMC certified to bid on contracts.

Defense contractors will need CMMC third-party certification before bidding on Department of Defense (DoD) contracts. Contractor self-assessments are being phased out and will cease to be acceptable when submitting a bid. However, completing a self-assessment before a CMMC audit will give Defense Industrial Base (DIB) companies the best chance at CMMC compliance on the first try.

As of September 2020, the Department of Defense (DoD) Requests for Information (RFI) and Requests for Proposal (RFP) documents will begin to include CMMC requirements. The phased rollout has plans that all new DoD contract bids will require CMMC compliance by 2026.

The Department of Defense (DoD) recognizes that risk profiles differ for each contract and does not want to burden its Defense Industrial Base (DIB) with unnecessary requirements. Request for Information (RFI) and Request for Proposal (RFP) documents will outline which CMMC level 1 – 5 will be required. Level 1 certification is the easiest to obtain and ensures contractors meet basic requirements to protect Federal Contract Information (FCI). Each subsequent level offers further protections based on the Federal Contact Information (FCI) and Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) handled by the DIB.

CMMC requires third-party certification before bidding on defense contracts. CMMC Levels 1-3 include the 110 controls already established in NIST 800-171, but CMMC also requires 20 practices and 52 maturity processes.

A CMMC Third Party Assessment Organization (C3PAO) is an organization licensed by the CMMC Accreditation Body (CMMC AB) to contract and manage the CMMC assessment process for certification.A CMMC Third Party Assessment Organization (C3PAO) is an organization licensed by the CMMC Accreditation Body (CMMC AB) to contract and manage the CMMC assessment process for certification.

The Department of Defense (DoD) Request for Information (RFI) and Request for Proposal (RFP) documents will specify the level of CMMC certification required for each contract.

  • AM.3.036. Define procedures for the handling of CUI data.
  • AU.3.048. Collect audit logs into a central repository.
  • AU.2.044. Review audit logs.
  • IR.2.093. Detect and report events.
  • IR.2.094. Analyze and triage events to support event resolution and incident declaration.
  • IR.2.095. Develop and implement responses to declared incidents according to pre-defined procedures.
  • IR.2.097. Perform root cause analysis on incidents to determine underlying causes.
  • RE.2.137. Regularly perform and test data back-ups.
  • RE.3.139. Regularly perform complete and comprehensive data back-ups and store them off-site and offline.
  • RM.3.144. Periodically perform risk assessments to identify and prioritize risks according to the defined risk categories, risk sources, and risk measurement criteria.
  • RM.3.146. Develop and implement risk mitigation plans.
  • RM.3.147. Manage non-vendor-supported products (e.g., end of life) separately and restrict as necessary to reduce risk.
  • CA.3.162. Employ code reviews of enterprise software developed for internal use to identify areas of concern that require additional improvements.
  • SA.3.169. Receive and respond to cyber threat intelligence from information sharing forums and sources and communicate to stakeholders.
  • SC.2.179. Use encrypted sessions for the management of network devices.
  • SC.3.192. Implement Domain Name System (DNS) filtering services.
  • SC.3.193. Implement a policy restricting the publication of CUI on publicly accessible websites (e.g., Forums, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, etc.).
  • SI.3.218. Employ spam protection mechanisms at information system access entry and exit points.
  • SI.3.219. Implement DNS or asymmetric cryptography email protections.
  • SI.3.220. Utilize email sandboxing to detect or block potentially malicious email attachments.

Automated Complete Guidance for all Processes and Policies

Schedule your demo